Power your planet

Redefining the benchmarks against which performance is measured.
Smarter Systems for a Smarter Planet.

Power Systems™ performance allows clients to get the work done with fewer and/or smaller systems. This advantage has helped our clients to reduce the total cost of ownership with savings in software costs for products licensed by the core, energy costs, floor space, and other operational costs. IBM Power servers lead HP and Sun in performance in highend systems, in midrange systems, in entry systems, and in blade systems. That's right – Power servers are the leader in all the categories.

Compare servers with more than 16 processor chips

IT managers grapple with the issue of server sprawl and the accompanying high cost of management, combined with the explosion in energy use in the datacenter. The IBM Power™ 795 offers a new class of high end system that delivers three to four times the performance per core and over 4 times more system scalability than either the 128-core HP Integrity SuperDome and the 256-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000. When combined with PowerVM™ virtualization, the industry’s most scalable virtualization technology for UNIX®, IBM i and Linux®, the Power 795 becomes the premier solution for data center consolidation next to the IBM System z® mainframe.

The Power 795 and the Power 595 outperform the HP Superdome and Sun M9000 in a variety of benchmarks. The IBM Power 795 delivers the most scalable results ever across the major published benchmarks including 126,063 SAP users on SAP’s SD 2-Tier benchmark. The POWER6, 64-core IBM Power 595 server outperforms the 128-core HP Integrity Superdome – more performance with ½ the cores. The 595 also has 90% of the performance of the 256-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 – 90% of the performance with ¼ the cores.

The Power 795 and 595 servers can offer you this fabulous performance for your UNIX applications.

System-wide benchmark results
System name TPC-C SPEC int_rate2006 SPEC fp_rate2006 SPEC jbb2005 2-tier SAP
IBM Power 795 No benchmark 11,200 9,930 21,058,767 126,063
IBM Power 595 6,085,166 2,160 2,180 3,435,485 No benchmark
HP Integrity Superdome 4,092,799 1,650 1,480 2,054,864 No benchmark
Sun SPARC Enterprise 9000 No benchmark 2,590 2,100 1,757,035 32,000
Per-core benchmark results
System name TPC-C SPEC int_rate2006 SPEC fp_rate2006 SPEC jbb2005 2-tier SAP
IBM Power 795 No benchmark 43.7 38.7 82,260 492.4
IBM Power 595 95,080 33.7 34.0 53,679 No benchmark
HP Integrity Superdome 31,974 12.8 11.6 16,053 No benchmark
Sun SPARC Enterprise 9000 No benchmark 10.1 8.2 6,863 125

The benchmarks above show the outstanding systems performance and scalability of the high end Power Systems, but in a consolidation environment that may not be the only critical factor. Besides delivering over 3X the performance per core, the IBM Power 795 also delivers more than 2 times the memory capacity, 5 times the memory bandwidth per core and over 2 times the I/O bandwidth of the HP SuperDome and the Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000. Some applications are more bound by memory constraints, either based on the quantity of memory available or the memory bandwidth. Others are constrained by I/O bandwidth. The IBM Power 795 design enables it to deliver workload optimizing performance across most all types of applications. It is no surprise why clients are shifting workloads to the Power Enterprise servers for workload consolidation.

32 or more processor chip systems memory and I/O characteristics
  IBM Power 795 IBM Power 595 HP Superdome Sun M9000
Cores 256 or 128* 64 128 256
Memory (GB) 8,192 4,096 2,048 4,096
Memory bandwidth (GB/s) 4,366 1,376 273.1 737
I/O bandwidth (GB/s) 640 640 172.8 234
Memory (GB) per core 32 or 64 64 16 16
Memory bandwidth (GB/s) per core 17 or 34 21.5 2.13 2.88

* 128 cores in TurboCore mode

Compare eight and sixteen processor chip servers

The workhorse UNIX database and application servers have to deliver cost effective, reliable performance for mission-critical applications. Using advanced features like virtualization, IBM POWER processor performance, and mainframe-inspired reliability, availability, and serviceability (RAS) characteristics, the IBM Power 780 and 770 servers epitomize what those servers should be.

The POWER processor technology and advanced system design of the servers create a system with leadership-balanced performance. Very fast processors with very fast system busses, I/O bandwidth, and large memory capacity leads to the astounding performance proven by the number of leadership commercial and technical benchmarks.

The result is the very best performance for a eight processor chip server which is even faster than any competitive sixteen processor chip servers, and the very best performance per core of any server.

We compare performance because the exceptional speed of Power Systems allows you to improve end user's service. And this is designed to be done with fewer cores which helps reduce your cost and improve system manageability. The following table summarizes the best eight to sixteen core server performance results for the IBM Power servers versus Sun SPARC servers, HP Integrity servers UNIX servers and Xeon 7500 servers. The results show that the Power servers have the very best performance.

Eight and sixteen socket capable systems benchmark results
  TPC-C SPEC int_rate2006 SPEC fp_rate2006 SPEC jbb2005 2-tier SAP SD
64-core IBM Power 780 No benchmark 2,610 2,300 5,210,501 37,000
32-core IBM Power 780 No benchmark 1,470 1,310 3,031,184 No benchmark
8-core IBM Power 780 1,200,011 No benchmark No benchmark No benchmark No benchmark
64-core IBM Power 770 No benchmark 2,140 1,900 4,604,894 No benchmark
64-core X7500 best result No benchmark 1,378 No benchmark 3,369,694 18,140
32-core HP Integrity rx8640 No benchmark 416 371 No benchmark No benchmark
64-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M8000 No benchmark 753 582 817,158 No benchmark
32-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M8000 No benchmark 352 333 395,989 No benchmark
16-core HP Integrity rx7640 No benchmark 201 181 No benchmark No benchmark
32-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M5000 No benchmark 335 223 No benchmark No benchmark

The Power 780 and 770 servers lead competitive systems in capacity by far. However that is only one measure of performance. Better performance per core helps reduce cost in hardware acquisition, software licensing, and a variety of operational areas. The following table shows the Power 780 and 770 server performance per core compared to competitive servers.

Eight and sixteen socket capable systems per core benchmark results
  TPC-C SPEC int_rate2006 SPEC fp_rate2006 SPEC jbb2005 2-tier SAP SD
64-core IBM Power 780 No benchmark 40.7 35.9 81,414 578
32-core IBM Power 780 No benchmark 45.9 40.9 94,724 No benchmark
8-core IBM Power 780 150,001 No benchmark No benchmark No benchmark No benchmark
64-core IBM Power 770 No benchmark 33.4 26.3 71,951 No benchmark
64-core X7500 best result No benchmark 20.9 No benchmark 51,903 250
32-core HP Integrity rx8640 No benchmark 13.0 11.5 No benchmark No benchmark
64-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M8000 No benchmark 11.7 9.0 12,768 No benchmark
32-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M8000 No benchmark 11.0 10.4 12,374 No benchmark
16-core HP Integrity rx7640 No benchmark 12.5 11.3 No benchmark No benchmark
32-core Sun SPARC Enterprise M5000 No benchmark 10.4 6.9 No benchmark No benchmark

With performance per core more than double the competitors, the Power servers can enable you to reduce the number of servers and/or the size of servers you require to do your production. Consolidation using the PowerVM feature of the Power Systems can also help you increase the utilization of your servers which could enable you to even further reduce cost by implementing fewer servers.

Processing power is not the only resource required by applications. Other resource is also required for consolidation. Power Systems have that resource. For example, on a per-core basis, the TurboCore Power 780 with 32 cores has four times the memory, over fifteen times the memory bandwidth, and more than four times the I/O bandwidth of the HP Integrity rx8640, and eight times the memory, over eleven times the memory bandwidth, and over seven times the I/O bandwidth of the Sun SPARC Enterprise M8000.

Eight and sixteen processor chip systems memory and I/O charactreristics
  IBM Power 780 HP rx8640 Sun M8000
Cores 32 64 32 64
Memory (GB) 2,048 2,048 512 512
Memory bandwidth (GB/s) 1,091 1,091 68 184
I/O bandwidth (GB/s) 236 236 48 61
Memory (GB) per core 64 32 16 8
Memory bandwidth (GB/s) per core 34.1 17.0 2.1 2.9
I/O bandwidth (GB/s) per core 7.4 3.7 1.5 1.0

This combination of more performance per core and more I/O and memory capacity and bandwidth per core helps you to reduce the number of servers or the number of cores per server. This could have a major impact on reducing your cost of server acquisition and your total cost of ownership for your IT environment.

Compare four socket servers

As four socket servers become faster, more customers find them the right performance for mission-critical applications. They also are often the right servers for distributed applications in stores and branch banks. The same POWER7® technology that makes the Power 780 the fastest eight processor chip server helps make the IBM Power 750 Express system the fastest UNIX four socket server. The comparison to the four socket UNIX servers from Sun and HP and four socket Xeon 7500 servers help demonstrate this.

Four socket capable systems benchmark results
  2-tier SAP SD SPEC jbb 2005 SPECint_rate 2006 SPECfp_rate 2006
IBM Power 750 Express 15,600 2,478,929 1,070 865
4-socket x86 best result (Intel X75xx) 10,490 2,021,525 788 573
HP Integrity rx6600 No benchmark 372,140 102 71
HP Integrity BL870 i2 No benchmark No benchmark 269 No benchmark
Sun SPARC Enterprise M4000 No benchmark No benchmark 135 112
32-core Sun SPARC Enterprise T5440 4,720 841,380 360 270

Like their larger counterparts, the four socket Power servers also have significantly greater memory and I/O bandwidth per core than the HP and Sun systems. They are also designed to support consolidated environments.

Compare two socket servers

The introduction of POWER7 processor-based, two-socket Express systems gives clients a new set of options in deploying their workloads and enables midsize companies the opportunity to take advantage of POWER7 technology in platforms aligned to their capacity and price needs. Now clients of any size can take advantage of Power Systems leading performance (up to 50% more performance than an HP ProLiant Intel-based system and nearly 3X the performance of the Sun SPARC Enterprise T5240), PowerVM virtualization technology, and the reliability of Power servers to reduce their IT management and support costs while deploying new, higher performance applications.

Two socket systems performance
Entry systems performance SPECjbb 2005 SPECint_rate 2006 SPECfp_rate2006
IBM Power 730 Express 1,216,983 574 466
2-socket HP ProLiant G7 (Intel x86) 875,975 382 277
HP Integrity rx3600 No benchmark 62.4 54.8
Sun SPARC Enterprise T5240 422,782 157 119

Compare blade servers

Blade servers have become increasing popular because of their outstanding flexibility, simplified management, and efficiency. The performance of POWER7 processors has helped the IBM BladeCenter® PS700, PS701, and PS702 Express to be the leaders among RISC and Itanium blade servers in these metrics. This flexibility and efficiency directly leads to reduced cost of energy and datacenter floor space savings. The superior performance of the Power based blades leads to a requirement for fewer blades which also helps reduce cost of management, and software licensing as well as additional reductions in energy and floor space usage.

Two socket blade performance
System name SPECint_rate2006 SPECfp_rate2006 SPECjbb2005
IBM BladeCenter PS702 Express 520 431 1,119,946
HP Integrity BL860c i2 134 136 No benchmark
Sun Blade T6340 160 121 388,456
Best Xeon 5600 blade 380 256 No benchmark

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Jeroen Pijpelink

Technical Support

Browse Power Systems

To draw insights and make better decisions, businesses rely on the secure, flexible and open platform of IBM Power Systems. Built with the first processor designed for big data workloads, the design of Power Systems combines the computing power, memory bandwidth and I/O in ways that are easier to consume and manage, building on strong resiliency, availability and security.

IBM Power Systems deliver flexibility and choice of operating systems to enable your business to support the next generation applications for big data and analytics and cognitive computing that are transforming how organizations work today. Whether running 1, 2, or all 3 - coupled with PowerVM, they maximize the benefit of Power Systems in your business.

System software

Transform your business with Systems Software that enables virtualization, high availability, flexibility, security and compliance on Power Systems™. IBM’s integrated approach to developing Systems and Systems Software together delivers optimized results with Power Systems.

As an open innovation platform, Power Systems is optimized for big data and analytics performance and to deliver scale-out economics and security for the cloud. IBM and IBM Business Partner solutions exploit key capabilities in IBM Power Systems.

Migrate to Power

Over the last five years thousands of Oracle and HP UNIX clients have migrated to POWER. Learn how Power Systems has helped them improve their business performance, reduce risk, and establish a more secure future.

Next generation applications for big data and analytics and cognitive computing are providing unprecedented insights into opportunities, threats and efficiencies. IBM Power Systems is at the forefront of delivering solutions to gain faster insights from analyzing both structured information and unstructured big data. With the secure, flexible and open platform of IBM Power Systems plus solutions and software, organizations can outpace their competitors by delivering faster services, providing differentiated offerings and turning operational cost into investment opportunity.