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IBM Extends Linux Support to Next-Generation E-Mail Access Web Client From Lotus Software


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CAMBRIDGE, MA - 22 Jan 2003: IBM today announced Linux client support for Lotus iNotes Web Access software, helping to bring the flexibility and lower costs of browser-based messaging to Linux users. Lotus iNotes Web Access software enables workers to access Lotus-Notes based functions, such as e-mail and calendaring, anywhere they can find an Internet connection.

With today's announcement, the Lotus iNotes Web Access software will now support the most recent Linux version of Netscape 7.0, a popular browser based on Mozilla 1.0.1, giving customers the ability to view and respond to e-mail by logging onto the Web.

As Linux continues to gain momentum in the financial services space, this offering is especially appealing for use with banking organizations by giving branch employees authenticated access to e-mail and calendaring functions over the Web, while helping to eliminate the costs of having a separate, dedicated e-mail system at each branch office.

"This expanded support for Linux marks an important step as we move into the 'On Demand' era where companies will be able to access information and applications regardless of platforms," said Ken Bisconti, Vice President, Messaging Solutions, IBM Lotus Software. "In today's fast-paced market, nothing may be as critical as authenticated access to information from any location, at anytime. By making iNotes Web Access available for Linux, IBM Lotus is delivering a key element to enterprise customers as they look to tightly integrate business processes, people and information."

IBM estimates that up to 20% of employees are considered "deskless" workers and don't have a dedicated workspace, but still need to access the same messaging and back-end business applications as the rest of the company. This new category of users, such as factory floor workers, airline pilots and retail workers, represents a new market opportunity for Lotus Software, as most browser-based messaging solutions do not have the security features, performance, feature set or reliability that iNotes Web Access delivers to the corporate market.

IBM iNotes Web Access 6 allows businesses to easily integrate remote workers with critical data and applications. Users have access to Lotus Domino-based applications, including e-mail, calendaring and scheduling, anywhere they can find an Internet connection -- without sacrificing the full application functionality of a standard Lotus Notes client. Combining the flexibility and manageability of a corporate-level Web client with the performance and security features of Linux will help IBM reach an emerging market of new users and can help customers lower the overall costs of their messaging solutions.

With Lotus iNotes Web Access, customers using multiple platforms, including Linux, will be able to leverage all the benefits of the IBM Lotus Domino platform, including off-line support that will allow users to remain productive even when disconnected from the network.

As with IBM Lotus Notes and Domino 6, Lotus iNotes Web Access 6 offers robust security benefits and can help increase productivity, while helping to reduce the total cost of ownership associated with a company's messaging and collaboration infrastructure. Key cost-saving elements of iNotes Web Access 6 include:

Pricing and Availability
Lotus iNotes Web Access for Linux client licenses with software maintenance are available for $48.65 per client (Passport Advantage Volume License Program - Level A Suggested Volume Price) with a discount available depending on volume commitments. Lotus iNotes Web Access is available for selected Linux and Windows 32-bit operating systems. Lotus Domino for Linux with iNotes Web Access support will be available in Q1 2003, while iNotes Web Access Linux client support will be generally available in 2H 2003.

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