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IBM Honors Elite Technical Employees

Company Salutes 515 of Its Best and Brightest Innovators in the World

PHOENIX, AZ - 20 May 2008: IBM (NYSE: IBM) has elevated nine employees to the title of IBM Fellow -- its most prestigious technical honor. The company also presented more than $3.5 million in cash awards to corporate and patent portfolio awardees in addition to awards given to more than 500 IBM technical leaders from around the world directly responsible for collaborating to deliver true innovation and business value.

IBM conferred the accolades and awards at its 2008 Corporate Technical Recognition Event (CTRE) in Phoenix, Ariz. CTRE is a 45-year tradition at IBM, established to recognize exceptional technical employees and reward them for extraordinary achievements and contributions to the company's technology leadership.

"Fueled by the extraordinary achievements put forth by our technical community of 214,000 professionals, this year's honorees have displayed an organic sense of the crucial importance of operating within a global culture, and this has resulted in a caliber of work that is raising the bar even higher," said Nick Donofrio, executive vice president, Innovation and Technology, IBM. "By defying the limitations of geographic boundaries, their outstanding technical accomplishments have made IBM a stronger company. Their tireless drive and passion for excellence along with their outstanding body of work is generating real value for our clients, for our company and for our world."

Among the special honorees at the 2008 CTRE are nine employees who earned the coveted distinction of IBM Fellow:

-- Emmanuel Crabbé
Systems and Technology Group, East Fishkill, New York

Dr. Emmanuel Crabbé is an extraordinary and steadfast contributor to the IBM Systems and Technology Group. As Chief Technologist for the Systems Group, he has consistently demonstrated leadership in technology development, qualification, and product bringup. In particular, Dr. Crabbé's work in leading the process development team that designed and implemented the 65-nanometer process resulted in the successful general availability of the eClipz POWER6 system in June 2007. His work in this area has led directly to the POWER6 systems boasting the world's highest frequency of operation.

-- Robert H. High Jr.
Software Group, Austin, Texas

As an industry pioneer in the field of Services Oriented Architecture (SOA), Robert H. High Jr. has positioned IBM as a leader in delivering critical technologies to its clients. His leadership of the SOA Foundation, which lays out the basic business case behind IBM's advocacy of SOA, has allowed the company to communicate an understanding of both the value and structure of SOA deployments to thousands of clients. It has served as the genesis of the SOA Portfolio, a core contribution of future Software Group and Global Business Services profitability.

-- Hiroshi Ito
Research, San Jose, California

Today, all advanced chips in the world are produced with chemically amplified photoresists, a process co-invented by Dr. Hiroshi Ito. Without this revolutionary technology, advances in semiconductor technology would have fallen behind the timeline set forth by Moore's Law. Dr. Ito's invention has greatly aided the production of more powerful chips at a lower cost, and contributed substantially to the worldwide economic growth of the last 15 years.

-- Susan L. Miller-Sylvia
Global Business Services, Sacramento, California

Susan L. Miller-Sylvia has established herself as a leader in the worldwide Global Business Services community and a mentor with relentless influence on IBM technical professionals and executives. She is a member of the Americas IT Architect Board, and a pioneer in the development of image technology solutions, particularly as it pertains to enterprise content management, document management, digital media, and unstructured data.

-- David Nahamoo
Research, Yorktown, New York

Over the last 25 years, Dr. David Nahamoo has championed worldwide efforts to realize spoken language as the inevitable mode of interaction with digital systems. He is a world-class technician, having developed algorithms that contributed to IBM's leadership in speech recognition, some of which resulted in the company's highly successful deployment of ViaVoice. His research in the areas of acoustic modeling, training, and resource-optimized implementations has been at the core of IBM's Automatic Speech Recognition engines for years.

-- Pratap Pattnaik
Research, Yorktown, New York

Dr. Pratap Pattnaik has been appointed an IBM Fellow for his technical leadership in defining and optimizing the stack for IBM's enterprise server systems. He has been the chief architect and scientist for defining, designing and implementing the key research technologies that have influenced IBM's server design in the area of commercial systems and high-performance computing. His research has resulted in significantly faster and less expensive systems, and he has pushed the robustness of the UNIX operating system to new levels, yielding significant client value. Dr. Pattnaik's contributions span across the enterprise stack of systems, software and services, including partitioning, autonomic computing, and reliability, availability, and serviceability technologies. He was the first to recognize the importance of the memory subsystem in a multi-core system.

-- Thomas L. Seevers
Sales and Distribution, Lincoln, Nebraska

Dr. Thomas L. Seevers has been a leader in developing and defining the role of the Client IT Architect within IBM. He has contributed to the company's thought leadership around the development and deployment of IT architecture and systems integration, working directly with some of IBM's largest clients. He co-authored TeAMethod (Technical Architecture Method), a common approach to engaging clients and designing appropriate solutions. The approach has been used by more than 2,000 practitioners, and has enabled seamless transitions from sales to deployment. It has also been adopted as the basis for the continuing deployment of the Client Values Initiative. Dr. Seevers led the development of the IBM Industry Transformation Toolkit, which is a basis for understanding a client's needs and identifying the IBM solutions that address those needs.

-- Moshe Yanai
Systems and Technology Group, Waltham, Massachusetts

Moshe Yanai is one of the most influential contributors in the history of the data storage industry. His thirty years of technical expertise and design innovation are legendary. He has led three major waves of innovation in enterprise data storage, including: using fixed block architecture disks for mainframe storage; developing the Symmetrix high-end storage systems, the first that enabled multiple open system servers to connect to the same storage over SCSI; and finally, the development of the first truly scalable grid storage system, which he developed at XIV Ltd., a startup that was later acquired by IBM.

-- Harry M. Yudenfriend
Systems and Technology Group, Poughkeepsie, New York

As the lead technologist for IBM System z I/O, Harry M. Yudenfriend has developed and implemented a roadmap that has allowed consistent data growth, performance improvements, enhanced resilience, continuous availability, increased scale and improved efficiency. In particular, he has improved the server/storage synergy and increased the scale and intelligent management of devices attached to IBM System z. He is an inventor of HyperSwap and Dynamic I/O Reconfiguration Management for continuous availability, HyperPAV for improved efficiency and simplification and extended addressability volumes for increased scale, all of which added to the total of 90 patents issued or pending to his name.

The title of IBM Fellow is the company's most preeminent technical distinction and is granted in recognition of outstanding and sustained technical achievements and leadership in engineering, programming, services, science and technology. To further enhance their potential for innovative achievements they are given additional responsibilities in their areas of specialization. Only 209 individuals have earned this designation in the company's history and, including the newly named Fellows, 70 are active employees.

Examples of technology originated by IBM Fellows include:

In addition to honoring new and long-standing IBM Fellows, CTRE also recognizes and honors employees in the following areas:

More information on IBM Fellows can be found at http://www.ibm.com/research/resources/awards_fellows.shtml

Photos of the new IBM Fellows are available at http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/photos.wss?topic=228

Contact(s) information

Stefanie Sirc
IBM Technology and Innovation Communication Programs
877-786-6479
ssirc@us.ibm.com

Related resources

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Moshe Yanai Systems and Technology Group, Waltham, Massachusetts Moshe Yanai is one of the most influential contributors in the history of the data storage industry. His thirty years of technical expertise and design innovation are legendary. He has led three major waves of innovation in enterprise data storage, including: using fixed block architecture disks for mainframe storage; developing the Symmetrix high-end storage systems, the first that enabled multiple open system servers to connect to the same storage over SCSI; and finally, the development of the first truly scalable grid storage system, which he developed at XIV Ltd., a startup that was later acquired by IBM.

Emmanuel Crabbé Systems and Technology Group, East Fishkill, New York Dr. Emmanuel Crabbé is an extraordinary and steadfast contributor to the I B M Systems a n d Technology Group. As Chief Technologist for the Systems Group, he has consistently demonstrated leadership in technology development, qualification, and product bringup. In particular, Dr. Crabbé’s work in leading the process development team that designed and implemented the 65-nanometer process resulted in the successful general availability of the eClipz POWER6 system in June 2007. His work in this area has led directly to the POWER6 systems boasting the world’s highest frequency of operation.

Robert H. High Jr. Software Group, Austin, Texas As an industry pioneer in the field of Services Oriented Architecture (SOA), Robert H. High Jr. has positioned IBM as a leader in delivering critical technologies to its clients. His leadership of the SOA Foundation, which lays out the basic business case behind IBM’s advocacy of SOA, has allowed the company to communicate an understanding of both the value and structure of SOA deployments to thousands of clients. It has served as the genesis of the SOA Portfolio, a core contribution of future Software Group and Global Business Services profitability.

Hiroshi Ito Research, San Jose, California Today, all advanced chips in the world are produced with chemically amplified photoresists, a process co-invented by Dr. Hiroshi Ito. Without this revolutionary technology, advances in semiconductor technology would have fallen behind the timeline set forth by Moore’s Law. Dr. Ito’s invention has greatly aided the production of more powerful chips at a lower cost, and contributed substantially to the worldwide economic growth of the last 15 years.

David Nahamoo Research, Yorktown, New York Over the last 25 years, Dr. David Nahamoo has championed worldwide efforts to realize spoken language as the inevitable mode of interaction with digital systems. He is a world-class technician, having developed algorithms that contributed to IBM’s leadership in speech recognition, some of which resulted in the company’s highly successful deployment of ViaVoice. His research in the areas of acoustic modeling, training, and resource-optimized implementations has been at the core of IBM’s Automatic Speech Recognition engines for years.

Pratap Pattnaik Research, Yorktown, New York Dr. Pratap Pattnaik has been appointed an IBM Fellow for his technical leadership in defining and optimizing the stack for IBM’s enterprise server systems. He has been the chief architect and scientist for defining, designing and implementing the key research technologies that have influenced IBM’s server design in the area of commercial systems and high-performance computing. His research has resulted in significantly faster and less expensive systems, and he has pushed the robustness of the UNIX operating system to new levels, yielding significant client value. Dr. Pattnaik’s contributions span across the enterprise stack of systems, software and services, including partitioning, autonomic computing, and reliability, availability, and serviceability technologies. He was the first to recognize the importance of the memory subsystem in a multi-core system.

Thomas L. Seevers Sales and Distribution, Lincoln, Nebraska Dr. Thomas L. Seevers has been a leader in developing and defining the role of the Client IT Architect within IBM. He has contributed to the company’s thought leadership around the development and deployment of IT architecture and systems integration, working directly with some of IBM’s largest clients. He co-authored TeAMethod (Technical Architecture Method), a common approach to engaging clients and designing appropriate solutions. The approach has been used by more than 2,000 practitioners, and has enabled seamless transitions from sales to deployment. It has also been adopted as the basis for the continuing deployment of the Client Values Initiative. Dr. Seevers led the development of the IBM Industry Transformation Toolkit, which is a basis for understanding a client’s needs and identifying the IBM solutions that address those needs.

Harry M. Yudenfriend Systems and Technology Group, Poughkeepsie, New York As the lead technologist for IBM System z I/O, Harry M. Yudenfriend has developed and implemented a roadmap that has allowed consistent data growth, performance improvements, enhanced resilience, continuous availability, increased scale and improved efficiency. In particular, he has improved the server/storage synergy and increased the scale and intelligent management of devices attached to IBM System z. He is an inventor of HyperSwap and Dynamic I/O Reconfiguration Management for continuous availability, HyperPAV for improved efficiency and simplification and extended addressability volumes for increased scale, all of which added to the total of 90 patents issued or pending to his name.

Susan L. Miller-Sylvia Global Business Services, Sacramento, California Susan L. Miller-Sylvia has established herself as a leader in the worldwide Global Business Services community and a mentor with relentless influence on IBM technical professionals and executives. She is a member of the Americas IT Architect Board, and a pioneer in the development of image technology solutions, particularly as it pertains to enterprise content management, document management, digital media, and unstructured data.

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