Skip to main content

National Academy of Engineers Elects Two More IBM Researchers

Robert Fontana and Bernie Meyerson joined an impressive list of more than 50 IBM employees this month when the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) elected them to join its ranks.

Yorktown Heights, NY, USA - 26 Feb 2002: Robert Fontana and Bernie Meyerson joined an impressive list of more than 50 IBM employees this month when the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) elected them to join its ranks. Founded in 1964 under the same congressional act of incorporation that established the National Academy of Sciences, the NAE provides engineering leadership in service to the nation.

IBM Research's Innovative Minds
The NAE elected Fontana for his "contributions to microfabrication techniques for the manufacture of thin-film storage devices." He is a Research Staff Member in the Recording Heads function of the Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California.

Fontana received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975. Six years later he came to IBM, where he has worked on thin-film magnetic recording heads, which have enabled the industry's 3,000-fold increase in data storage density and, in turn, a multitude of innovative technologies. He currently serves as President of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Magnetics Society.

Meyerson's election citation notes his "development of low-temperature epitaxy of SiGe for the fabrication of hetero-junction, bipolar, integrated circuits for telecommunications." He works at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, as Vice President of the Communications Research and Development Center (CRDC). The CRDC is a multinational organization encompassing IBM's worldwide communications technology and circuit design efforts in both the Research and Microelectronics Divisions, and supports a rapidly growing worldwide customer base.

Meyerson is a native New Yorker who grew up in Manhattan and received his Ph.D. in Solid-State Physics from the City College of the City University of New York in 1980, after which he began working for IBM. His significant contributions to many different projects within IBM include leading the team of researchers that developed a silicon-germanium (SiGe) HBT (Hetero-junction Bipolar Transistor) technology. SiGe technology has led to numerous commercial and consumer products -- 40 Gbit/sec SONET standard data systems and 802.11b 11Mbit/sec wireless LAN cards being limited examples.

A Prestigious Award
The NAE is one of the most highly regarded organizations within the research community. Academy membership honors those who achieve "important contributions to engineering theory and practice" and demonstrations of "unusual accomplishment in the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology."

With this year's newly elected members, the NAE now boasts 1,857 active members and 250 members emeriti in the United States, and 158 associates abroad.

Related resources

Site links

Related XML feeds
Topics XML feeds
Research
Chemistry, computer science, electrical engineering, materials and mathematical sciences, physics and services science