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IBM Ships World's Highest-Resolution Computer Display

Image as clear as an original photograph: applications in science, engineering, publishing, medicine and more

The Ultimate Display for the Ultimate Supercomputer</span></strong><br /></div></p><p><br /><span>The Livermore Lab will use the displays to study the operation & aging of nuclear weapons using 3 - 10 Nov 2000:

speeding treatment by replacing conventional film X-rays. Physicians will be able to view digitally photographed X-rays immediately on the display. The X-ray images could also be sent online to specialists around the world for instant feedback and counsel. Automotive -- improving safety and saving millions of dollars by automating design. Crisp digital images can replace hundreds of hand-built design models for all the different parts of the car, allowing for instant changes and speedier development.

Weather Forecasting -- improving early warning forecasting. Large printed satellite maps and photographs can be replaced with photo-quality digital images, allowing meteorologists to quickly interpret weather patterns and instantly share them with colleagues around the world.

Design -- increasing productivity. Designers ranging from publishing, fashion, furniture, home building and beyond can save time and reduce eye strain through high-resolution displays, while also reducing the need for printing.
IBM has been working on this new display technology in its research labs in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., and Yamato, Japan, since 1995. The new active matrix liquid crystal display is based on research that allowed the IBM team to use aluminum instead of molybdenum and tungsten, metals traditionally used in displays. IBM has also demonstrated the use of copper in experimental displays and plans to use copper in future display technologies. Aluminum and copper are better conductors and make low-cost, high-resolution possible.

For more information on IBM Research, go to http://www.research.ibm.com.

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Contact(s) information

Matthew McMahon
IBM
(914) 945-3499
mattm@us.ibm.com

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