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Shared Medical Systems Applies IBM Shark Storage Servers for Critical Data


Malvern, Penn - 21 Dec 2000: IBM announced today that Shared Medical Systems Corporation, a healthcare industry network computing leader, has unleashed IBM's Shark Enterprise Storage Server to handle its growing application service provider business.

Shared Medical Systems (SMS) is an outsourcer of information systems to health enterprises and health providers in North America, Europe, and New Zealand. It conducts as many as eight million transactions a day. Since the first installation of IBM's Shark Storage server, SMS has scaled from 0 to 7.4 terabytes of data in less than a year, with plans to keep growing.

Currently, SMS is using 4.8 TB Shark servers to store data from its service provider business running critical healthcare and clinical systems on IBM mainframe servers. In addition, 2.66 TB Shark servers are supporting a new SMS offering of Lawson's Financial application, as well as supporting the corporation's 7000 Lotus Notes users running on an IBM Unix server.

"With IBM's Shark servers we've seen a great performance boost from our DB2 applications and the overnight processing of our clinical and financial records as well as the nightly data backup has improved by 40 percent," said Nelson Gray, IT Manager, SMS. "Shark proves that IBM is back in the storage game, and we're glad to see it."

SMS selected IBM for superior price performance and the ability to reduce management complexities. The Shark also fits with its plans to centralize storage. SMS has been able to reduce the amount of direct attached storage and consolidate data on the Shark servers for easier management. One of the most significant performance improvements is attributed to Shark's Multiple Allegiance function, which allows multiple IBM mainframe servers to access the same disk server at the same time. As a result, SMS no longer has a bottleneck from online users requesting data and the backup or batch processing of records.
"Businesses are turning to IBM because the price and performance of Shark is unbeatable," said Walter Raizner, vice president of marketing, IBM Storage Systems Group. "In addition, Shark's superior technology and function provide our customers with the ability to service their customers better, which is especially crucial in the service provider market."

The Shark Enterprise Storage Server is the high performance disk storage solution from IBM, the world leader in storage systems, software, services and technology. Built on the foundation of IBM's Seascape (1) Storage Enterprise Architecture, Shark works with Windows NT, UNIX, Novell NetWare, and the IBM eServer* family -- and with a variety of interfaces, including Fibre Channel, Ultra SCSI and ESCON. 'Shark' incorporates IBM unique technology such as Parallel Access Volumes (PAV) currently unavailable in competing systems from EMC and Hitachi Data Systems.

For more information on the Enterprise Storage Server and its performance advantages over competing products, visit http://www.ibm.com/storage.

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(1) Seascape is IBM's storage enterprise architecture, a blueprint for comprehensive storage solutions optimized for a connected world. The Seascape architecture outlines next-generation concepts for storage by integrating modular "building block" technologies from IBM, including disk, tape and optical storage media, powerful processors, and rich software. Integrated Seascape solutions are highly reliable, scalable and versatile, supporting specialized applications on servers ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

IBM and Enterprise Storage Server are registered trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation. All other trademarks are the properties of their respective companies.

*The IBM eServer brand consists of the established IBM e-business logo with the following descriptive term "server" following it.

Contact(s) information

Clint Roswell
IBM
1-914-766-3675
roswellc@us.ibm.com

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