Skip to main content

2011 Commuter Pain Survey

Small Banner

IBM’s annual Global Commuter Pain survey provides a unique look into the interplay between traffic congestion and human emotions -- from New York to Nairobi. The survey, which polled 8,042 commuters in 20 cities on six continents, is conducted by IBM to better understand consumer attitudes around traffic congestion as the issue reaches crisis proportions around the world. IBM compiled the results of the survey into its Commuter Pain Index that ranks the emotional and economic toll of commuting in each city, with the highest ranking being the most onerous.

Population growth, urbanization and globalization are placing great strains on the world's transportation systems - impacting citizens personally, economically and environmentally. It’s estimated that up to $30 trillion will be spent on transportation infrastructure globally over the next 20 years. Improving physical infrastructure only goes so far, especially with the ever-present debate on the best ways to maintain roads, rails and terminals in the face of strained budgets and resources. By integrating technology and intelligence into the physical transportation infrastructure, we can improve capacity, enhance the traveler experience and make transportation systems more efficient, safe and green.

20 city images on Flickr:

News releases
Date Title
08 Sep 2011 IBM Global Commuter Pain Survey: Traffic Congestion Down, Pain Way Up

Images

  • IBM Commuter Pain Index thumbnail

    IBM 2011 Commuter Pain Index

    Date added: 08 Sep 2011

    To better understand consumer attitudes around traffic congestion as the issue continues to grow around the world, IBM conducted the 2011 Commuter Pain survey. The IBM Commuter Pain Index, illustrated in this speedometer graphic, ranks the emotional and economic toll of commuting in 20 international cities. From right to left, cities are plotted from least painful starting with Montreal and gradually increase to the most painful city, Mexico City.


Contact(s) for the Press kit

Sara Delekta Galligan
IBM Media Relations
415-545-6715
sdelekta@us.ibm.com