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  • BRABUS custom interiors

    BRABUS custom interiors


    Date added: 2013-07-02


    BRABUS has a global reputation and a leading market position in customization, primarily Mercedes-Benz, but it also upgrades other brands of cars, aircraft and yachts. With their new Car Configurator running on the Black Point Arts Cloud City and powered by IBM PureSystems, BRABUS will be able to handle increases in data volumes, improve response times related to images and videos on their website, and increase access to content for their customers. (Credit: BRABUS)

     

     



  • BRABUS Car Customizer

    BRABUS Car Customizer


    Date added: 2013-07-02


    The interactive BRABUS Car Configurator is very data hungry and the system requirements are increasing rapidly as they add new car models, additional design functions, and integrated videos. The Black Point Arts Cloud City is powered by IBM PureSystems and can be expanded dynamically to meet BRABUS' needs. (Credit: BRABUS)

     

     



  • "A Boy and His Atom" Movie Still

    "A Boy and His Atom" Movie Still


    Date added: 2013-05-01


    Caption: IBM scientists precisely positioned almost 10,000 atoms into nearly 250 images to create the Guinness-certified "World's Smallest Stop Motion Film." The movie, called "A Boy and His Atom," was created using the Nobel prize winning scanning tunneling microscope, weighing 2 tons and operating at a temperature of -268 degrees Celsius. Researchers use this tool to understand atomic properties for memory, data storage and future technologies for big data. (Courtesy: IBM)

     

     



  • "A Boy and His Atom" Movie Poster

    "A Boy and His Atom" Movie Poster


    Date added: 2013-05-01


    IBM scientists precisely positioned almost 10,000 atoms into nearly 250 images to create the Guinness-certified World's Smallest Stop Motion Film. The movie, called A Boy and His Atom, was created using the Nobel prize winning scanning tunneling microscope, weighing 2 tons and operating at a temperature of -268 degrees Celsius. Researchers use this tool to understand atomic properties for memory, data storage and future technologies for big data. (Courtesy: IBM)

     

     


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