Skip to main content

Image gallery


  • random

    IBM Supercomputing Simulations Support Chip Breakthrough


    Date added: 2007-02-26


    Zurich, Switzerland, 26 February 2007—IBM (NYSE:IBM) researchers today announced an advancement in computer-based simulations that is helping to drive chip technologies to new heights of performance and function. As reported in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, a team of scientists at IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory for the first time used advanced supercomputer-based models to more deeply understand and master the complex behavior of a promising new material—hafnium dioxide—in silicon transistors, the fundamental building blocks of computer chips. Image of a typical model of hafnium silicates used in this study. A smaller model of approx. 300 atoms is shown. It is rendered in a so-called ball-and-stick graphical representation, where the balls represent atoms (silicon in orange, hafnium in blue and oxygen in red) and the sticks represent the chemical bonds. On the basis of these models, IBM researchers calculated the important electronic properties and behavior of hafnium silicate.

     

     



  • casino

    IBM Supercomputing Simulations Support Chip Breakthrough


    Date added: 2007-02-26


    Zurich, Switzerland, 26 February 2007—IBM (NYSE:IBM) researchers today announced an advancement in computer-based simulations that is helping to drive chip technologies to new heights of performance and function. As reported in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, a team of scientists at IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory for the first time used advanced supercomputer-based models to more deeply understand and master the complex behavior of a promising new material—hafnium dioxide—in silicon transistors, the fundamental building blocks of computer chips. Image of a typical model of hafnium silicates used in this study. A zoomed-in view is shown. The model contains more than 600 atoms and 5000 electrons. It is rendered in a so-called ball-and-stick graphical representation, where the balls represent atoms (silicon in orange, hafnium in blue and oxygen in red) and the sticks represent the chemical bonds. On the basis of these models, IBM researchers calculated the important electronic properties and behavior of hafnium silicate.

     

     



  • Carbon nanotube: Light emissions

    Carbon nanotube: Light emissions


    Date added: 2005-11-08


    IBM scientists simultaneously inject positive and negative charges into a carbon nanotube through the source and drain electrodes at its two ends.

     

     

     



  • Spintronics

    Spintronics


    Date added: 2005-11-08


    Twenty-first century spinning wheel: Harnessing the power of electron spin -- the quantum property that is responsible for magnetism -- is the goal of IBM Fellow Stuart Parkin and SpinAps, the new IBM-Stanford research center announced today. Central to their research is a new six-chamber, $5 million high-vacuum apparatus within which scientists can mix and match three nanotech materials manufacturing techniques and analyze the results. Built around a central wheel-shaped robot, this device will enable scientists to make and test unique materials much more rapidly than had been possible before.

     

     

     



  • Spintronics: Spin flip spectroscopy technique

    Spintronics: Spin flip spectroscopy technique


    Date added: 2005-11-08


    Conceptual diagram of the new IBM "spin-flip spectroscopy" technique. Electrons (red) tunnel from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (top) through an atom (red circle) resting on a surface (bottom). When the electrons' energy exceeds a certain value, it flips the atom's spin, or magnetic orientation, from down to up (represented by the arrows within the circle).

     

     

     


Previous | 6 - 10 of 10 results