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  • IBM'S ATOMIC "CHICKENWIRE" FOR NANOELECTRONICS

    IBM'S ATOMIC "CHICKENWIRE" FOR NANOELECTRONICS


    Date added: 2008-03-06


    The image on the left shows a single layer, or sheet of carbon molecules known as Graphene. The noise that occurs from electrical signals bouncing around in the material as a current is passed through it is greater as the device is made smaller and smaller, impeding the performance for nanoscale electronics. In the image on the right, the IBM scientists demonstrated for the first time that adding a second sheet of Graphene reduces the noise significantly, giving promise to this material for potential use in future nanoelectronics.

     

     



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    IBM Supercomputing Simulations Support Chip Breakthrough


    Date added: 2007-02-26


    Zurich, Switzerland, 26 February 2007—IBM (NYSE:IBM) researchers today announced an advancement in computer-based simulations that is helping to drive chip technologies to new heights of performance and function. As reported in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, a team of scientists at IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory for the first time used advanced supercomputer-based models to more deeply understand and master the complex behavior of a promising new material—hafnium dioxide—in silicon transistors, the fundamental building blocks of computer chips. Image of a typical model of hafnium silicates used in this study. A complete view is shown. The model contains more than 600 atoms and 5000 electrons. It is rendered in a so-called ball-and-stick graphical representation, where the balls represent atoms (silicon in orange, hafnium in blue and oxygen in red) and the sticks represent the chemical bonds. On the basis of these models, IBM researchers calculated the important electronic properties and behavior of hafnium silicate.

     

     



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    IBM Supercomputing Simulations Support Chip Breakthrough


    Date added: 2007-02-26


    Zurich, Switzerland, 26 February 2007—IBM (NYSE:IBM) researchers today announced an advancement in computer-based simulations that is helping to drive chip technologies to new heights of performance and function. As reported in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, a team of scientists at IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory for the first time used advanced supercomputer-based models to more deeply understand and master the complex behavior of a promising new material—hafnium dioxide—in silicon transistors, the fundamental building blocks of computer chips. Image of a typical model of hafnium silicates used in this study. A smaller model of approx. 300 atoms is shown. It is rendered in a so-called ball-and-stick graphical representation, where the balls represent atoms (silicon in orange, hafnium in blue and oxygen in red) and the sticks represent the chemical bonds. On the basis of these models, IBM researchers calculated the important electronic properties and behavior of hafnium silicate.

     

     



  • casino

    IBM Supercomputing Simulations Support Chip Breakthrough


    Date added: 2007-02-26


    Zurich, Switzerland, 26 February 2007—IBM (NYSE:IBM) researchers today announced an advancement in computer-based simulations that is helping to drive chip technologies to new heights of performance and function. As reported in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, a team of scientists at IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory for the first time used advanced supercomputer-based models to more deeply understand and master the complex behavior of a promising new material—hafnium dioxide—in silicon transistors, the fundamental building blocks of computer chips. Image of a typical model of hafnium silicates used in this study. A zoomed-in view is shown. The model contains more than 600 atoms and 5000 electrons. It is rendered in a so-called ball-and-stick graphical representation, where the balls represent atoms (silicon in orange, hafnium in blue and oxygen in red) and the sticks represent the chemical bonds. On the basis of these models, IBM researchers calculated the important electronic properties and behavior of hafnium silicate.

     

     




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