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  • IBM introduces the first Watson-based cognitive computing solution for oncology

    IBM introduces the first Watson-based cognitive computing solution for oncology


    Date added: 2013-02-11


    Mark Kris, MD, Chief of Thoracic Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (LEFT) and Manoj Saxena, IBM General Manager, Watson Solutions (RIGHT) work with the first Watson-based cognitive computing solution for oncology. IBM, Memorial Sloan-Kettering and WellPoint today introduced the first commercially based products based on Watson at an IBM health care forum in New York City. (Credit: Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service)

     

     



  • IBM discussed new uses of Watson in medicine during an IBM health care event in NYC

    IBM discussed new uses of Watson in medicine during an IBM health care event in NYC


    Date added: 2013-02-11


    Manoj Saxena, IBM General Manager, Watson Solutions (RIGHT) discussed new uses of Watson in medicine during an IBM health care event in New York City. IBM, Memorial Sloan-Kettering and WellPoint today introduced the first commercially available Watson-based cognitive computing solutions for oncology and utilization management. (Credit: Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service)

     

     





  • A Patent Milestone

    A Patent Milestone


    Date added: 2013-01-10


    IBM topped the U.S. patent list for the 20th consecutive year in 2012. The company's inventors received a record 6,478 patents in 2012 for a range of inventions that will enable advancements across key domains, such as analytics, Big Data, cybersecurity, cloud, mobile, and a new era of cognitive computing systems. IBM Master Inventor Stephen Bedell (pictured) shows a new class of flexible and versatile semiconductor materials enabled by U.S. Patent #8,247,261 that will power ultra-thin, lightweight and flexible products and can be applied to a wide range of technologies such as biomedical, security, wearable computing and solid-state lighting. (Credit: Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service for IBM)

     

     



  • Keeping Data Centers Cool on the Dawn of Winter


    Keeping Data Centers Cool on the Dawn of Winter



    Date added: 2012-12-20


    With holiday shoppers rushing to take advantage of the final week of "free-shipping" offers from online retailers, computer rooms will need to keep the air conditioning on, even though the first day of winter is two days away. With more than 33 million servers in the world, cooling the computers is an acute problem. Most data centers use 25% of their total energy to simply cool their machines. IBM's Energy Efficiency Lab in Poughkeepsie, NY. was the setting for a two-year project with the U.S. Department of Energy that ends next week, to devise new methods of cooling computers. Here, IBM engineer, Milnes David, inspects the chilled innards of a radiator-equipped IBM computer. The radiators slash the amount of energy required to cool a typical data center -- from 25% to less than 4%. IBM demonstrated the new radiator technology in June 2012, when it built the world's fastest, hot-water cooled supercomputer for the Leibniz Superconductor Center in Germany. The patented cooling technology is an option available on all of IBM's servers. (Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service for IBM) More info: Michael Corrado, mcorrado@us.ibm.com

     

     

     


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