The following are text extracts from the IBM "Tucson Dedication 1980" booklet.


Landscaping at the site demonstrates the success of IBM's determination to preserve natural vegetation and habitat wherever possible. Landscaping in the central courts, around buildings and adjacent to parking areas . . . reflects the same care to limit plantings to indigenous flora compatible with the arid environment. Moreover, the formal landscape plan strives to provide a pleasing working environment, and to complement building architecture.

Along the streams, rivers and flood plains of the southwestern desert is found a distinctive environment known as the "riparian habitat" . . . [which] nurtures varieties of plant life markedly more lush than those of the surrounding desert. It is this oasis-type of environment that landscape designers have simulated in selected areas of the GPD [General Products Division] Tucson site.

Various elements of the site's design lend themselves to the riparian habitat theme. The courtyards formed by the building layout resemble desert canyons, which also cradle this habitat.

IBM Tucson landscaping

Landscaping around buildings uses local plant life.

Landscaping around buildings uses local plant life.
Landscaping around buildings uses local plant life.
Riparian landscaping is evident in areas of the site where activity is most intense, These areas feature generous plantings of deciduous trees and native shrubs that flourish along natural stream beds and arroyos, as well as herbaceous ground covers.

IBM Tucson landscaping

Indigenous flora in proximity to the site.

Indigenous flora in proximity to the site.
Indigenous flora in proximity to the site.
Natural desert [environments] include those areas left undisturbed. Denser growths of desert trees, shrubbery and drought-resistant plants form the arid region's lush landscaping, which can be found in areas adjacent to parking lots.