IBM 3740

IBM introduced the 3740 data entry system on January 22, 1973.

IBM introduced the 3740 data entry system on January 22, 1973.
IBM introduced the 3740 data entry system on January 22, 1973. The 3740 moved the product line a step further into field effect transistor (FET) technology, and was developed and manufactured in IBM's facility in Rochester, Minn. The integrated family of 3740 products introduced a new recording medium -- the IBM diskette -- and was the first IBM General Systems Division product to use FET technology.

The IBM 3740 data entry system brought fast, flexible, efficient data entry to either high-production, centralized operations or to decentralized, remote operations. By using 1,898-record IBM diskettes as the entry medium rather than punched cards or computer tape, the 3740 also provided wider application possibilities than other contemporary entry methods.

Seen in the foreground of this 3740 product publicity shot is the IBM 3742 dual data station, which was designed primarily for centralized, high-production data entry. It was used by two operators concurrently, with each one keying to his own diskette.

Pictured in the left background is the IBM 3747 data converter, a standalone unit that converted diskette data into half-inch computer tape. To its right, in the middle background, is an IBM 3713 printer that printed at up to 40 characters a second. At the far right stands an IBM 3741 data station which was designed as a decentralized data entry work station.

The IBM 3740 data entry system was withdrawn from marketing on December 20, 1983, nearly 11 years after its debut