1130 Photo album

1131 central processor

1131 central processor
1131 central processor

The IBM 1131 central processing unit provided core storage capability of between 4,096 and 32,768 addressable binary words of 16 bits, plus two parity bits. Output from the console was via a modified IBM Selectric typewriter at 15.5 characters a second.

1130 installation (I)

1130 installation (I)
1130 installation (I)

Seen here, from left, are an IBM 1442 card read punch (which could read 90, 300 or 400 cards per minute and punch 80 or 160 columns per second); an IBM 2501 card reader (which could read 600 or 1,000 cards a minute); in the center foreground, an IBM 1131 central processing unit; behind the 1131, an IBM 1133 multiplex control enclosure; at right, an IBM 2310 disk storage (two of which provided more than 2.5 million 16-bit words of online storage capacity); and in the right background, an IBM 1403 printer (which printed at 210, 340 or 600 lines per minute).

Engineer & 1130

Engineer & 1130
Engineer & 1130

The IBM 1130 computing system was designed for on-the-job problem solving by engineers, scientists and business people. A portable information storage device, the IBM 2315 disk cartridge (foreground), enabled users to maintain their own programs and data on individual disks. Disks could be inserted, as shown, in the computer for immediate processing when needed. This 1130 could perform computations at the rate of 120,000 additions a second.

1130 with two 2310 disk storages

1130 with two 2310 disk storages
1130 with two 2310 disk storages

In April 1967, IBM announced a four-way expansion of the 1130 system. New features for the desk-sized computer, IBM's smallest at the time, included the ability to read information from five magnetic disks concurrently. Previously, only one self-contained disk (foreground) was available. But, in 1967, up to four additional disks (right, rear) could be added. Each could store up to one million characters of information.

1130 production

1130 production
1130 production

IBM manufacturing people seen here in the autumn of 1968 are engaged in the final assembly of the 1130 computer system at IBM's Boca Raton, Florida, facility. The first 1130 built at "Boca" was shipped to Royal Crown Bottling Co. in July 1968.

1130 installation (II)

1130  installation (II)
1130 installation (II)

The 1130's operator is inserting a 2315 disk into the 1131 central processing unit. The 2315 provided a convenient way for users to store their own programs and data. The disk was encased in a protective plastic cartridge and could be stored by users in their own desks or office cabinets. Once inserted into the 1131, the disk was engaged in two ways. A power drive caused the disk to spin at 1500 revolutions a minute. At the same time, a forked arm extended to read and write on both magnetic surfaces of a spinning disk. Programs could be transferred from the disk to the 1130's core memory at the rate of 35,000 16-bit words a second.

1131 central processor

Example

1130 installation (I)

Example

Engineer & 1130

Example

1130 with two 2310 disk storages

Example

1130 production

Example

1130 installation (II)

Example