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Test 000-034: IBM Tivoli Monitoring V6.2.2 Fundamentals


Note: This test will be withdrawn on Nov 30 2013.
The replacement test is: (000-503) IBM Tivoli Monitoring V6.3 Fundamentals


Section 1 - IBM Tivoli Monitoring Infrastructure


  1. Given a basic understanding of IBM Tivoli Monitoring (ITM), describe ITM and the various components such as Tivoli Enterprise Portal Server (TEPS), Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server (TEMS), agents, the data warehouse and event synchronization, so that the ITM infrastructure and its functions have been explained.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Tivoli Enterprise Portal (TEP) - used to view and monitor network events generated by an agent.

    2. TEPS - is a collection of software services for the client that enables retrieval, manipulation, and analysis of data from monitoring agents.

    3. TEMS - acts as a collection and control point for alerts received from agents, collects performance and availability data from agents, and passes this data to TEPS for presentation in the portal console.

    4. Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent - monitors a system or sub system and resources and sends data from monitored managed systems to the monitoring server for display in the portal server.

    5. Data warehouse is an optional component for storing historical data collected from agents in your environment.

    6. Event synchronization is an optional component which is configured to send situation event updates that were forwarded to a Tivoli Enterprise Console event server or a Netcool/Omnibus Object Server back to the monitoring server.

  2. Given a basic understanding of ITM, describe the most common Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agents and their functions, so that the functions of the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent have been explained.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agents are installed on the systems or subsystems whose applications and resources you want to monitor. An agent collects monitoring data from a managed system and passes it to the monitoring server it is connected to.

      1. Universal Agent - it is a general purpose data collector. Universal Agent allows you to create your own system monitoring solutions for any kind of data from almost any computer platform.

      2. Operating system agents - they monitor system statistics and has pre-configured thresholds and workspaces already defined. This is an out of the box solution for monitoring the appropriate operating systems (Linux, UNIX, Windows).

      3. UNIX Log Agent - it monitors a predefined UNIX operating system log file.

  3. Given a basic understanding of ITM, describe the TEMS component and its function, so that the purpose of the TEMS has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. TEPS connects to the hub TEMS.

      1. The monitoring server acts as a collection and control point for alerts received from the enterprise monitoring agents, and collects performance and availability data from them.

      2. The hub monitoring server correlates the monitoring data collected by monitoring agents and any remote servers and passes it to the portal server for presentation.

  4. Given a basic understanding of ITM, describe the TEPS component and its function, so that the purpose of the TEPS has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. TEPS is a collection of software services for the client that enables retrieval, manipulation and analysis of data from the monitoring agents in the enterprise.

    2. It stores all:

      1. workspaces

      2. queries

      3. users

      4. historical data collection configuration

    3. Create and configure the managed system lists and situations.

  5. Given a basic understanding of ITM, describe the TEPS component and its function, so that the purpose of the TEPS database has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The portal server uses a DB2, embedded database or Microsoft® SQL database to store various artifacts related to presentation at the portal client.

    2. The TEPS database stores user data and information required for graphical presentation on the user interface.

    3. The portal server database is created automatically during configuration of the portal server.

  6. Given a basic understanding of ITM, describe the TEP clients, so that the TEP client has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. TEP client can be deployed in three ways.

      1. The desktop client requires that you load and run the installation software on each computer where the desktop client will be run. Users start TEP the same way they do their other locally installed applications. With the desktop client, you can also create multiple instances for connecting to different portal servers.

      2. The browser client runs in a supported browser. The client software is downloaded from the TEP server the first time you log on to the portal with a browser. You can start the browser client from any browser-enabled computer by entering the URL for the portal server.

      3. The Java Web Start like the browser client, the client software is accessed through a URL and downloaded from the portal server. Unlike the browser client, which is always operated inside a browser, the Web Start client is run as a desktop application.

  7. Given a basic understanding of ITM, describe the usage of the data warehouse, so that the data warehouse has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The Tivoli Data Warehouse solution refers to the set of IBM Monitoring components, successfully installed and configured, that interact to collect and manage historical data. These warehouse components include the TEPS, Tivoli Data Warehouse db, the Warehouse Proxy Agent and the Summarization and Pruning Agent. This allows users to analyze historical trends from monitoring agents. You can generate warehouse reports for short term or long term data through TEP. Warehouse reports provide information about the availability and performance of your monitoring environment over a period of time.

      1. The warehouse proxy agent receives data collected by monitoring agents and moves it to the Tivoli Data Warehouse database.

      2. The Summarization and Pruning Agent provides the ability to customize the length of time the data is saved (pruning) and how often to aggregate granular data (summarization) in the Tivoli Data Warehouse database.

    2. Some reporting packages can be used to extract data for trending analysis reports.

    3. The IBM Tivoli Performance Analysis Agent also uses Tivoli Data Warehouse input.

    4. Tivoli Data Warehouse supports DB2, Oracle, Microsoft® SQL databases.

  8. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe what the Warehouse Proxy Agent does, what it monitors and where it can be installed, so that the functions of the Warehouse Proxy Agent have been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The Warehouse Proxy Agent receives data collected by monitoring agents and moves it to the Tivoli Data Warehouse database.

    2. The Warehouse Proxy Agent provides you with the capability to monitor the Warehouse Proxy itself.

    3. It requires an ODBC/JDBC connection to the Tivoli Data Warehouse.

    4. There can be more than one Warehouse Proxy Agent in an ITM environment.

    5. The Warehouse Proxy Agent is packaged as part of the Base ITM Installation Image.

    6. It can only be configured using a Windows or X Windows environment.

    7. It is supported on Windows and most versions of UNIX and Linux.

  9. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe what the Summarization and Pruning Agent (S&P) does, what it monitors and where it can be installed, so that the S&P has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Provides the ability to customize the length of time that (historical) data is saved in the Tivoli Data Warehouse.

    2. Provides the ability to determine how often to aggregate, or summarize, granular (historical) data in the Tivoli Data Warehouse.

    3. Allows Pruning and Summarization to be run at scheduled intervals and times.

    4. Provides you with the capability to monitor the Warehouse Summarization and Pruning Agent itself.

    5. Requires an ODBC/JDBC connection to the Data Warehouse.

    6. Requires a connection to the TEPS.

    7. There is only one S&P Agent per Data Warehouse/ITM environment.

    8. The S&P is packaged as part of the Base ITM Installation Image.

    9. It can only be configured using a Windows or X Windows environment.

  10. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe what the Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services is, what platforms it runs on and what basic functions it provides, so that the functions of the Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services have been explained.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services is a GUI interface.

    2. It allows the control of ITM components.

    3. It is available on MS Windows and Unix/Linux systems.

    4. You can stop/start and restart ITM components.

    5. On UNIX/Linux it requires the X Environment and an X emulator.

    6. On MS Windows and UNIX /Linux you can configure/re-configure ITM components.

    7. On MS Windows environments the Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services has many more features, such as adding component variables, viewing trace logs, editing trace parameters and killing processes.

  11. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe how ITM is able to forward situation events from ITM to either Tivoli Enterprise Console or OMNIbus, as well as sync updates in Tivoli Enterprise Console or OMNIbus back into ITM, so that the integration between these products has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Situation Event Forwarding:

      1. to Tivoli Netcool/OMNIbus - The Hub TEMS can be configured to forward ITM situation events to the Tivoli Event Integration Framework (EIF) probe, which will then normalize the situation event data into a format that can be inserted into a Netcool/OMNIbus ObjectServer.

      2. to Tivoli Enterprise Console - The Hub TEMS can be configured to forward ITM situation events to Tivoli Enterprise Console (by generating a Tivoli Enterprise Console event).

    2. Event synchronization (via Situation Update Forwarder):

      1. from Tivoli Netcool/OMNIbus to ITM - Event synchronization (via the Situation Update Forwarder process) can be installed and configured on the Netcool/OMNIbus server to allow updates made to events in the ObjectServer to be sent back to the corresponding situation events in ITM.

      2. from Tivoli Enterprise Console to ITM - Event synchronization (via the Situation Update Forwarder process) can be installed and configured on the Tivoli Enterprise Console server to allow updates made to events in the console to be sent back to the corresponding situation events in ITM.

  12. Given the requirement that Operations staff get a console view of all incoming and open alerts from ITM and that the ITM Event Console can handle only a limited number of events in any given period successfully, describe why and when would you choose to implement an external event console, so that the purpose of when and why to use an external event console has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Determine the number of events arriving at the Hub TEMS per hour or day.

    2. Determine if Operations currently use an Event Console tool and use it as their standard tool.

    3. Implement an external Event Console if this is currently the standard for Operations or if the number of events exceeds a few hundred per day.

  13. Given basic operator experience with ITM, explain how application support is the collection of configuration data (workspaces, situations, queries, help, Take Actions, etc.) needed by TEMS, TEPS, and the TEP clients that allows ITM data to be viewed by a user, so that application support has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Application support is the configuration data that allows data collected by ITM to be viewed.

    2. Application support must be installed under:

      1. TEMS, both Hub and Remote

      2. TEPS

      3. TEP Desktop client

      4. external console if one is being used

    3. A few of the Application support are:

      1. data definitions

      2. workspaces

      3. online help

      4. expert advice

      5. situations

      6. queries

      7. take actions

      8. templates

      9. policies


Section 2 - Using Monitoring Data


  1. Given the need to perform useful event monitoring, and using the workspaces found within the Tivoli Enterprise Portal (TEP), review the various data elements by which a monitoring agent keeps track of the state of a managed system. Determine the current properties and status of these managed systems, using these data elements (attributes), to determine meaningful criteria for analysis, so that appropriate thresholds can be determined and defined in situations.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Monitoring agents collect data that are made up of attributes, which represent the properties of systems or networks, such as the amount of CPU usage or the message ID.

    2. An attribute can be a data element in a workspace and is usually found in one of the various online reports.

    3. Navigate to various workspaces to attributes where system events could likely occur (such as a CPU usage increase).

  2. Given the need to perform useful event monitoring, state how related attributes are packaged together for ease of use in the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server (TEMS), so that attribute groups and their purpose have been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Attributes are organized into attribute groups.

    2. The attributes in a group can be displayed in a query-based view (table, chart or relational topology) or used to specify a condition for testing in a situation.

    3. When you open the view or start the situation, data samples are taken of the selected attributes.

    4. The TEMS has several attribute groups you can use for reporting the status of your monitoring agents and situations.

    5. Attribute groups can be common among all IBM Tivoli Monitoring v6.2.2 (ITM) framework products, or they can be unique to the current product.

    6. ITM comes with a set of common attribute groups that can be applied to any managed system, such as universal time attributes and local time attributes.

  3. Given the need of the ITM user to fully understand the data streams within ITM to be able to correctly plan and implement a well performing Monitoring environment, list the data available from ITM and match these with the requirements from the users.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Determine which monitored attributes are available from the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent manual or directly from the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent's catalog and attribute files.

    2. Determine user requirements for monitoring by interviewing these users or by running workshops.

    3. Determine which data is required for historical collection, at which frequency, how it should be summarized and when it can be pruned.

    4. Determine which data are critical for daily operations and should be used in Situations to raise an event.

    5. Determine if there are any requirements that are currently not being collected and need a new type of agent, either out of the box or self built.

    6. Arrange the data in queries, views, workspaces, logical views, situations, historical data collection settings etc.

  4. Given the requirement from the Tivoli Enterprise Portal (TEP) user to have the monitoring data available in a specific format, describe how a TEP View should be adapted to display these data, so that the TEP view has been modified and saved.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Right click on the view to be modified and select ‘Properties'.

    2. Alternatively, click on the ‘Properties' icon on the View.

    3. Click on ‘click here to assign a Query'.

    4. From the list of existing Queries, either select an existing Query or click on the ‘Create Query' icon at the top left.@If Create Query was selected, enter the name, description, category and data source - next select attribute groups and underlying attributes to be displayed.

    5. On the ‘Specification' view, select the attributes to be collected from the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent.

    6. Optionally, add any conditions to limit the scope of rows to be collected at the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent.

    7. Click on ‘ok' to return to the Views Properties.

    8. On the Query tab, specify how many rows should be returned by page.

    9. On the Filters tab, specify further criteria to limit the scope of rows to be displayed in the View.

    10. On the Style tab, further specify options for view formatting, depending on the chosen type of View.

    11. Save by clicking on OK.

    12. If the View is to be changed permanently with the Workspace, click on ‘Save Workspace' icon.

  5. Given the requirement to visualize monitoring data on the TEP client according to user requirements, new queries have to be created and used within a View/Workspace, so that a new query is now available from the Query selection list.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. A Query is to be created either by separately selecting the Query Editor icon from the main TEP toolbar or, when in editing the properties of a View, selecting on ‘click here to assign a Query' and then clicking on the Create Query icon.

    2. The name, description, category and data source - next select attribute groups and underlying attributes to be displayed.

    3. On the ‘Specification' view, select the attributes to be collected from the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent.

    4. Optionally, add any conditions to limit the scope of rows to be collected at the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent.

    5. Click on ‘ok' to return to the Views Properties if the query was started from the View Properties.

    6. If the Query editor was started from the main TEP toolbar, following actions are required:

      1. A workspace must be selected.

      2. Within the Workspace, select a view and right click or select its Properties icon.

      3. From the Properties window, select ‘click here to assign a Query'.

      4. Select the Query from the resulting list.

      5. Click on ‘ok' to return to the Views Properties.

      6. On the Query tab, specify how many rows should be returned by page

      7. On the Filters tab, specify further criteria to limit the scope of rows to be displayed in the View.

      8. On the Style tab, further specify options for view formatting,depending on the chosen type of View.

      9. Save by clicking on OK.

      10. Click on ‘Save Workspace' icon.

  6. Given the requirement of the TEP user to export monitoring data from a TEP View to an external file, describe the actions needed to achieve this, so that a new file with monitored data is available from the TEP View.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Open the workspace with the query-based view whose results you want to save.

    2. Because the current data display is exported, click Refresh if you want the latest results.

    3. Right-click inside the query-based view and click Export - if this option is not available, the View does not support it.

    4. In the Export to Disk window, select the location for the exported data, select a file type, type a file name - optionally change any of the rows/columns selections.

    5. If the file you are saving already exists, you can choose to overwrite the file with the current data selection, append the data to the file, or cancel.

  7. Given the requirement from TEP users to visualize monitoring data on the TEP Client in different formats, list the types of Views that can be created in a TEP Workspace, so that the types of views have been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Pie Chart

    2. Bar Chart

    3. Plot Chart

    4. Area Chart

    5. Circular Gauge

    6. Linear Gauge

    7. Notepad

    8. Table View

    9. Message Log

    10. Universal Message Console

    11. Graphic View

    12. Take Action View

    13. Terminal View

    14. Browser View

    15. Topology View

    16. Situation Event Console

    17. Common Event Console

    18. Tivoli Enterprise Console


Section 3 - IBM Tivoli Monitoring Usage


  1. Given basic familiarity with IBM Tivoli Monitoring v6.2.2 (ITM), describe how individual components are stopped and started on different platforms, using ITM functionality, so that the process to stop/start ITM components has been explained.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Determine which component to stop/start - Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server (TEMS), RTEMS, Tivoli Enterprise Portal Server (TEPS), Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent.

    2. Will the component be stopped using the Tivoli Enterprise Portal (TEP) (Non-OS Agents only), using the command line or using the Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services.

    3. Using the command line(Linux/Unix only).

      1. Log on to the system that the component is running on.

      2. cd to to the ITMHome/bin directory.

      3. Issue itmcmd agent stop/start xx where xx is the two digit component code or itmcmd server stop/start yyyy where yyyy is the TEMS name.

    4. Using the Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services.

      1. Log on to the system that the component is running on.

      2. Start the Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services.

      3. Right click the component to be managed and select stop/start.

    5. Using the TEP.

      1. Log on to the TEP.

      2. Expand the Navigator tree to the desired agent level Navigator item.

      3. Right click the item and select stop/start/restart.

  2. Given a basic understanding of ITM, describe the different types of users, including Administrators, Operations, Support teams and Management, so that the users and their roles have been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Administrators

      1. Maintain the ITM environment.

      2. Apply fixpacks.

      3. Ensure backups are taken.

      4. Add, remove and configure Servers and Agents.

      5. Ensure all TEPS are synchronized if there are more than one in an environment.

      6. Create and publish new TEP workspaces.

      7. Define TEP Users and Groups.

    2. Operations and Helpdesk

      1. Day to day monitoring.

      2. First level problem diagnosis and resolution.

      3. Escalate to support teams.

      4. Raising or problem records.

    3. Support teams

      1. Second level problem diagnosis and resolution.

      2. Monitoring of usage and performance trends via reporting.

    4. Management

      1. Use the TEP workspaces to see a high level view of how services and applications are performing.

      2. Monitoring of usage and performance trends via reporting.

  3. Given the need to create a new user, log on to the TEP, create the user and assign the appropriate permissions, so that the user ID has been created and is ready for use.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Log on to TEP.

    2. Click Administer Users icon.

    3. To create a new user with the default profile, click Create New User.

    4. To create a new user from an existing one, select the profile to copy and click Create Another User.

    5. Enter user information in the new user window.

    6. Click OK.

    7. Assign permissions, applications and navigator views as appropriate.

    8. When complete, click Apply or OK.

  4. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe what a workspace is, what it can display, its properties, what is delivered as default and what can be changed, so that workspaces within ITM have been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. A workspace is the working area of the TEP.

    2. Each workspace consists of one or more views.

    3. A view contains a chart or table showing detailed data from one or more monitoring agents.

    4. ITM and its agents come with pre-defined workspaces.

    5. With a few mouse clicks workspaces can be tailored to meet user requirements.

    6. Workspaces can be tailored to provide detailed data or summarized data.

    7. Historical data can be included in workspaces.

    8. Default workspaces can be copied, changed and saved as user workspaces.

    9. Each workspace has a number of properties which can be changed. These can include simple things such as colors, title and font.

    10. Properties also include the queries that return the data to the workspace.

    11. Workspaces can include such things as web browsers, 3270 terminal emulators and embedded consoles such as the Tivoli Enterprise Console.

  5. Given the need to enable workspace admin mode, log on to the tep, grant the required permissions to the selected user ID. Log on with the changed user ID and enable workspace admin mode.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Log on to the TEPS.

    2. Click on the Administer Users icon.

    3. Select the user ID that requires workspace admin mode.

    4. On the permission tab, select User Administration.

    5. Select the Administration Mode Eligible box.

    6. Click OK.

    7. Log on to the TEPS with the user ID selected in the step above.

    8. Click on the Administer Users icon.

    9. Select your user ID.

    10. On the Permission tab, select Workspace Administration.

    11. Select the Workspace Administration Mode box.

    12. Click OK, workspace admin mode is now enabled.

    13. To disable admin mode, repeat the appropriate steps above.

  6. Given basic ITM knowledge, describe what level of data can be collected, what the options are to limit or increase the amount of data collected, so that ITM data collecting options have been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The level of data collected by ITM can be altered.

    2. Historical data is collected so that problems can be diagnosed in greater depth at a later date and also for performance trending.

      1. Historical data can be collected at different intervals, 1, 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes or once a day.

      2. The data is loaded into the data warehouse every 15, 30 or 60 minutes, or 12 hours or once a day.

      3. If there are a large number of OS Agents and history recording is turned on for one attribute at 1 minute intervals, it is possible that the sheer volume of data will cause performance problems with the data warehouse, S&P and Warehouse Proxy Agent Agents.

      4. Not collecting enough data will make problem diagnosis and performance trending difficult.

      5. Too much data will fill the data warehouse quickly.

      6. Retrieving large amounts of data from the data warehouse to display in a workspace will affect performance.

      7. Using a reporting package such as Tivoli Common Reporting will remove work from the TEPS.

      8. There is a huge amount of attribute data that can be collected for each Agent type.

    3. Data displayed in Workspaces can be changed to collect more or less.

      1. A workspace displaying process information will require large amounts of data to be returned by the agent.

      2. Changing the query that collects the data to only return the required data will increase the performance of the agent.

      3. Setting filters at the workspace level can improve or degrade the TEPS performance.

      4. Selecting critical systems or applications to display in a workspace instead of all systems is a better option.

  7. Given an existing View on the TEP, describe how you can limit the scope of the rows returned from the Query, so that a new View has been modified to the requirements of the TEP user.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Select the View to be modified.

    2. Either click on its Properties icon or right click on the View and select Properties.

    3. Click on the Filters tab.

    4. In the resulting Filters view, take either or several of following actions:

      1. Unselect columns that you do not want to see on the resulting View.

      2. Add one or more conditions in rows 2 through x, specifying criteria to which rows must comply in order to be visualized on the TEP View.

    5. Click OK to confirm your choice(s).

    6. Save the Workspace if these choices are to be made permanently.

  8. Given the user requirement to visualize a specific time frame of monitoring data for a specific server or servers for a specific set of attributes, explain how this time span should be set on the View, so that the modified view reflect the new time selection criteria.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. On a specific TEP View, select the ‘Specify Time Span for Query' icon at the top left.@On the resulting window, select the appropriate time span.

      1. If ‘real time plus last' was selected, specify the number of hours for ‘last'.

      2. If ‘Last' was selected, specify the Unit and number of units - also specify whether detailed data or summarized data is to be used and which Timestamp column is to be used.

      3. If Custom was selected, specify the detailed time selection criteria.

      4. Optionally, these criteria can also be set to all Views that are associated with this Query.

      5. Optionally, lock this time span.

      6. Click OK to confirm.

  9. Given the end user requirements for which monitoring data are to be collected, define an attribute group to be collected with its specific settings, so that the historical data files will be created at the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent or TEMS and data will be sent to the warehouse.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. From the main TEP toolbar, select the icon for History Configuration (or alternatively, hit Ctrl+H or select Edit - History Configuration from the top).

    2. Next, select the type of Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent that collects the requested kind of data.

    3. Optionally the summarization and pruning options for this attribute group can be modified by changing the settings for this group in the ‘select attribute groups' window and changing its options in the configuration controls window - followed by clicking on ‘apply'.

    4. Right click the type of Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent and select ‘create new collection setting'.

    5. Provide a name for the setting and a description.

    6. Select the Attribute Group to be collected.

    7. Click on OK to continue.

    8. Set the required Collection Interval, Collection Location and Warehouse Interval.

    9. Click on the ‘Distribution' tab.

    10. Select to distribute to Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent or TEMS.

    11. Move one or more of the available systems to the ‘start collection on' window.

    12. Optionally ‘edit managed system groups' can be selected to edit the available groups or systems.

    13. Click on Apply to confirm or OK to also close the window.

  10. Given the requirement of TEP Administrators to distribute groups of objects (historical configurations and situations) to the same list(s) of systems, use the Object Group Editor to assign these objects in group to managed systems or lists of managed systems, so that
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. From the TEP, click on the Object Group Editor (or alternatively hit Ctrl-O or select Edit - Object Group Editor from the main menu).

    2. To edit Managed Systems groups

      1. Expand the Managed System group tab.

      2. Select the Type of the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent.

      3. Select the Managed System Group or right click to create a new group.

      4. Assign the required Managed Systems or Managed Systems Groups.

    3. To edit Historical Configuration/Situations Groups

      1. Expand the Historical Configuration/Situation group tab.

      2. Select a Historical Configuration/Situation Group.

      3. Assign any Historical Configuration/Situation items or groups.

      4. Click on the Distributions tab.

      5. Distribute to any of the available Managed Systems or Managed Systems Groups.

      6. Click on Apply to save the changes.

  11. Given the requirement to launch external applications from the Tivoli Enterprise Portal Client, describe the main features of this function, so that the launch feature has been described.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The launch application feature enables you to write definitions that start applications on your computer.

    2. A launch definition can include arguments that are passed to the application when it is started.

    3. You can invoke a definition at any time from the portal interface to launch the specified application.

    4. If your environment and user ID are configured for single sign-on, you do not need to re-authenticate as you launch into other applications.

  12. Given basic operator experience with ITM, describe how a user can navigate to the Take Action on a local or remote managed system and then run an Action (either a pre-defined Action or a custom command), so that the use of Take Action has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Select a Navigator item, right click and select "Take Action…" -> "Select…".

    2. Determine the action to run by doing one of the following.

      1. Select a pre-defined action from the "Name" drop-down menu, and set any required arguments.

      2. Input a custom command in the "Command" text box.

    3. Select the managed system(s) or remote managed system on which to run the action in the "Destination Systems" box.

    4. Click OK.


Section 4 - IBM Tivoli Monitoring Navigation


  1. Given basic experience with IBM Tivoli Monitoring v6.2.2 (ITM), explain how the Navigator tree provides access to the data that ITM collects via a hierarchical structure (Physical by default, Custom/Logical when defined as needed), so that the functions of the navigator tree have been explained.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The Navigator tree provides a hierarchical view of the enterprise (composed of all managed systems).

    2. The Navigator tree can provide the following views of the enterprise: Physical (default), Custom, and Logical.

    3. The Physical view has the following structure: Enterprise -> Platform -> System -> Agent -> Attribute

    4. The Navigator tree allows a user to drill-down to a particular managed system and view the attributes collected from that system.

    5. The Navigator tree provides:

      1. graphical access to the data collected by ITM (via workspaces).

      2. various tools for configuring monitoring thresholds (via situations), historical collection of data, custom queries of collected data, and etc.

  2. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe how one can use the Edit Navigator View button from the Tivoli Enterprise Portal (TEP) client to create a new Navigator View, so that the process to create a new Navigator view is defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. In the Navigator toolbar, click on the Edit Navigator View button.

    2. Click on the Create New Navigator View button, and provide a name (and description, if desired) for the new Navigator View.

    3. Use the "Create Child Item…" button to create custom Navigator items under the view, and to associate desired Available Managed Systems and System Groups with those items.

    4. Use the Source View portion (right-hand side) of the Edit Navigator View tool to drag over Navigator items to be shared from other pre-existing Navigator Views.

    5. Click OK when done.

  3. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe what a Logical Navigator View is and why it might be used (as opposed to the default Physical Navigator View), so that the use of a Logical Navigator View is understood.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. The default Navigator View (Physical) represents the physical hierarchy of the managed systems being monitored in the ITM environment.

      1. The Physical hierarchy follows the format "Enterprise -> Platform -> System -> Agent -> Attribute".

    2. Defining a Logical Navigator view allows managed system data to be displayed in other, more business-relevant ways:

      1. by Department

      2. by Site

      3. by other logical criteria

  4. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe how a user can navigate from the default workspace to another workspace for the same Navigator item, so that the capability to attach multiple workspaces to a single Navigator item is demonstrated.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. From a navigator item access the right click menu.

      1. Select the desired Navigator item in the TEP client, loading the default workspace.

      2. Right click the Navigator item, and place the mouse over the Workspace menu item.

      3. From the menu that pops out to the side, select the new workspace to be opened.

    2. Click on the Workspace Gallery icon and select the workspace from the pop-up that opens.

  5. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe how one can link workspaces in the TEP client, so that navigating to one particular workspace directly from another workspace is illustrated.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Open the source workspace (from where one will launch the link).

    2. Right-click one of the following possible link source locations:

      1. the highlighted Navigator item for this workspace

      2. an icon in a graphic view

      3. an object in a Tivoli Management Services Infrastructure view

      4. a row in a table view or situation event console view

      5. a data point in a chart view

    3. Right-click the current/highlighted Navigator item.

    4. Select "Link To…" -> "Link Wizard…" from the menu.

    5. Select "Create a new link" and click Next.

    6. Select the link type:

      1. Dynamic

      2. Absolute

      3. Relative

    7. Select the target Navigator View (if different from the current one).

    8. Drill-down until the Navigator item containing the target workspace is found and selected.

    9. Select the target workspace.

    10. Configure any other relevant link properties (based on the type).

    11. Click Finish when done.


Section 5 - IBM Tivoli Monitoring Event Management


  1. Given the need to perform useful event monitoring, and using the Tivoli Enterprise Portal (TEP) features found in the situation editor, determine how related managed systems are grouped together for ease of replication of common analysis criteria, so that when a situation is added or changed, the change is proliferated across all related managed systems, reducing error and providing consistency.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Determine the managed systems in a customer's IT environment with ‘like' tendencies and properties (such as a group of related CICS regions).

    2. Create a managed system list and give it a name to monitor these related managed systems.

    3. Add each managed systems to the managed system list.

    4. Create a situation for analysis.

    5. Assign the situation to the managed system list for event analysis.

    6. Change the value in the situation, and stop/restart the event monitoring.

  2. Given the need to perform proactive event management at times, and using the features provided in the TEP, state reasons why event analysis with alerts is enough (based on a situation), and when there are times that more automated actions are required (based on a policy).
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Review a list of common failures at a site over the past year or so.

    2. Beside each one, list the key attributes and event analysis threshold that would have been useful for notification to assure a swift response by support personnel.

    3. Analyze the list for what type of automated actions could have potentially solved the crisis more quickly (cancel a renegade task, beep the systems programmer, open a notepad list of ideas, and so on).

    4. Open the workflow editor in the TEP which is used to design policies.

    5. Review available criteria for setting up actions, scheduling work, or automating manual tasks based on the collected list of actions.

    6. Policies can take additional actions base on return codes (success) from the previous situations.

  3. Given the need to perform proactive event management at times, and using the features provided in the TEP, state reasons why the IBM Tivoli Monitoring v6.2.2 (ITM) framework event analysis would be conducted by sampling of data, as opposed to the determination of a pure event, so that the difference between pure and sampled events has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Review situations, alerts, and events in the monitoring functions section of the ITM v6.2.2 User's Guide.

    2. When the determination of the event must be made based on observations made at specific intervals, the event is known as a sampled event.

    3. When the event is based on a spontaneous occurrence, the event is known as a pure event.

    4. Situations for sampled events have an interval associated with them, while those for pure events do not.

    5. The condition that caused a sample event can change, thus causing it to be no longer true. Pure events cannot change.

    6. A sampled event becomes true when the number exceeds a threshold, and becomes false again when this number no longer exceeds the threshold. A pure event does not become a false event.

    7. The fact as to whether a event is sample or pure depends on how the attribute collection was defined.

  4. Given the need to perform event management and analysis to reduce business outages, and using the features provided in the TEP, describe the steps at a high level of setting up a situation and assigning it to a managed system, so that a situation has been set-up and assigned.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Review attributes or workspaces to see what would be a useful data element to monitor for events. Suggestions might be CPU usage or response time.

    2. Open the situation editor, select ‘create new situation', and follow the steps in the User's Guide selecting the chosen attribute field.

    3. Assign a value or threshold, and a condition.

    4. Review features for display options, expert advice, and persistence. Choose as appropriate.

    5. Select the distribution tab and assign the situation to a managed system (or more than one), or a managed system list.

    6. Optionally the until clause can be set to define how the alert can be closed.

    7. Optional the user can override the way the event will be forwarded to an external console.

  5. Given the need to perform event management and analysis to reduce business outages, and using the features provided in the TEP, describe how and why one would use the feature ‘situation persistence' when defining a situation.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Notice that persistence is useful for determining whether a condition is solid or intermittent (such as a CPU spike vs. a CPU solidly high condition).

    2. Open the situation editor, select a currently defined situation in edit mode, and check on the advanced tab.

    3. Place a number in persistence for consecutive cycles before an event is considered true (such as 2 for twice).

    4. If an event has persistence set to 3, and it's cycle is one minute, then it must be true three minutes in a row before the event is displayed as true on the TEP.

  6. Given the need to perform event management and analysis to reduce business outages and to find quick resolutions, using the features provided in the TEP, describe the difference between creating a situation from the situation editor (start from icon), or creating a situation from the navigator tree, so that the various ways to create a situation have been described.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. A situation must be associated with a Navigator item before you can see alerts when an event has opened.

    2. Association with a Navigator item is done automatically when you open the Situation editor from the Navigator Item, then create or edit a situation and click Apply or OK.

    3. Association with a Navigator item is done manually for situations created in the Situation editor (start from icon) when it was opened from the toolbar.

    4. Situation criticality can only be defined if opened by the navigator item.

  7. Given the need to perform event management and analysis to reduce business outages and to find quick resolutions, using the features provided in the TEP, describe how and why one would use the feature ‘Event Acknowledgement', to take ownership of a situation event when it occurs, so that the Event Acknowledge feature has been explained.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. When you see an event indicator in the Navigator, you can create an acknowledgement.

    2. An acknowledgement is created by right-clicking the item, and selecting ‘acknowledgement' form the pop-up menu.

    3. An acknowledgement notifies other users that you have taken ownership of the problem related to the event and are working on it.

    4. When you acknowledge an event, a blue checkmark appears next to the situation in the event flyover list and over the situation item in the Navigator.

  8. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe how pure and sampled situation events are closed, so that the difference between pure events and sampled events is defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. A sampled event arises from a situation that samples' data at regular intervals becomes true (e.g., when a threshold is crossed).

      1. Sampled events are closed automatically when the situation becomes false (e.g., when a value drops back below a threshold).

      2. Sampled events cannot be manually closed.

    2. A pure event results from an unsolicited notification for which a situation is monitoring (e.g., an entry in a log file, an SNMP trap, or etc.).

      1. Pure events must be closed manually, or via conditions in an UNTIL clause in the situation.

      2. Pure events cannot be automatically closed as sampled events can.

  9. Given the need to perform event management and analysis, to reduce business outages and to find quick resolutions, using the features provided in the TEP, describe how and why one would need to associate a situation with a navigator item, so that how to associate a situation with a navigator item has been defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. A situation must be associated with a Navigator item before you can see alerts when an event has opened.

    2. Right-click the Navigator item to which you want to associate a situation.

    3. Click Situations, then click Situations Filter to open the Show Situations window.

    4. Select ‘Eligible for Association' and clear ‘Associated with this Object'.

    5. Right-click the situation to associate with the Navigator item and click Associate options.

    6. Check your work by clicking Situation Filter, clearing Eligible for Association, and selecting Associated with this Object.

    7. The situations you associated with this Navigator item are then displayed in the list.

    8. To save your changes, click Apply to keep the Situation editor open,or click OK to close it.

  10. Given the need to perform event management and analysis to reduce business outages and to find quick resolutions, using the features provided in the TEP, describe how and why one would use the feature ‘Expert Advice' when defining a situation, so that the Expert Advice feature has been described.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Use Expert Advice to add comments or instructions, up to 500 characters, for the user to see in the event results workspace.

    2. Use Expert Advice to create a link to an existing page on the Web which contains relevant information.

    3. Expert Advice could be perceived as a way of writing your own help for an event.

    4. Open the situation editor, select a currently defined situation in edit mode, and review the data within the Expert Advice tab. If empty, consider what you would write in this section.

  11. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe the differences between reflex automation and workflow automation, so that users can distinguish between the two.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. A reflex automation is also referred to as a take action command, which is carried out when the situation is true. Reflex automation provides automated system actions. It allows you to monitor a condition on a particular system and to specify a command to execute there. The command can be a single action or a script of commands. Reflex automation is implemented by adding an action command to a situation definition that runs when an event is opened.

    2. Workflow automation is created in a policy. The policy uses the situation as its initial activity. The policy allows for complex workflow automation triggered by a situation including multiple actions checking return codes, etc.

  12. Given basic familiarity with ITM, describe the kind of data that can be used in a situation and displayed in a situation event, so that the use of Display Item in situations is defined.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. Situations are used to monitor when one or more conditions become true on a managed system (e.g., disk space percentage greater than a predefined amount).

    2. A situation can often monitor this condition for multiple instances of managed objects on a system (e.g., disk drives or log files).

    3. In order to indicate exactly where such a condition is true, it is necessary to display the most specific data possible (and often more specific than just the node/managed system information).

    4. By configuring a situation to use Display Item information collected from the managed system, this information can be displayed in a situation event, helping one to then isolate precisely where an issue is occurring on a managed system (e.g., a specific disk drive).


Section 6 - Fundamentals of IBM Tivoli Monitoring Problem Determination


  1. Given basic knowledge of IBM Tivoli Monitoring v6.2.2 (ITM), describe how a user can determine if a component of the ITM is failing, so that a user can determine what may be failing within the ITM architecture.
    With emphasis on performing the following tasks:

    1. One way to determine if a component is failing in the architecture is by opening up the Manage Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Services GUI interface and making sure that everything is running as it should be.

    2. A user can also tell if a component is having problems by simply logging in to the TEP client. Check the navigator tree for greyed out systems.



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