Checkpoint 1.2: Keyboard accessibility features

Do not interfere with keyboard accessibility features built into the operating system.


Rationale

The Windows operating system, CDE/Motif Unix systems, OS X, and iOS systems have a set of accessibility options which enable users with disabilities to customize system wide settings to improve accessibility. For example, a Windows user with a physical disability may not be able to press multiple key stroke sequences, such as Ctrl+Alt+Delete, simultaneously. Setting the Sticky Keys option enables the user to press and release the keys to invoke the desired function. For example, the user can press and release the Shift key 5 times, then press and release Ctrl, then Alt, then Delete to restart the Windows operating system.

Keyboard accessibility options make it possible for people with a variety of disabilities to use their computer. If the application software interferes with these options, some users may find their system unusable.

On Unix systems, they are part of the AccessX package. On Apple OS X systems, they are in System Preferences as part of Universal Access. On iOS systems they are available in Settings, General, Accessibility.


Required development techniques


The following techniques are the minimum required to meet Checkpoint 1.2 from the IBM Software Accessibility Checklist:

  1. Do not disrupt or disable documented operating system features for keyboard accessibility.
  2. Do not define application keyboard shortcut keys that interfere with documented shortcut keys for operating system accessibility features.

Examples for Windows developers

  1. Do not disrupt or disable documented operating system features for keyboard accessibility.

    Example 1

    On Windows, the user may customize the Accessibility Options available through the Control Panel settings.

  2. Do not define application keyboard shortcut keys that interfere with documented shortcut keys for operating system accessibility features.

    Example 2

    The following is a list of the accessible keyboard shortcut keys on Windows:

Examples for Unix, CDE/Motif developers

  1. Do not disrupt or disable documented operating system features for keyboard accessibility.

    Example 3

  2. Do not define application keyboard shortcut keys that interfere with documented shortcut keys for operating system accessibility features.

    Example 4

Examples for OS X developers

On Apple OS X systems accessibility is found in System Preferences under Universal Access.

  1. Do not disrupt or disable documented operating system features for keyboard accessibility.

    Example 5

  2. Do not define application keyboard shortcut keys that interfere with documented shortcut keys for operating system accessibility features.

    Example 6

Examples for iOS developers

On iOS systems the Accessibility options are part of the System settings. The iOS soft keyboard displayed on the screen does not support key repeat, except on delete and the repeat rate is not adjustable. The Bluetooth keyboard supports repeat, but the rate is not adjustable. Bluetooth keyboard pairing is done using System, Keyboard.

  1. Do not disrupt or disable documented operating system features for keyboard accessibility.

    Example 7

  2. Do not define application keyboard shortcut keys that interfere with documented shortcut keys for operating system accessibility features.

    Example 8

 

Required test techniques

Test the software to ensure that it complies with accessibility requirements.

Required test software

No additional software is required to test this checkpoint.

Windows test techniques

The following techniques are required to verify this checkpoint:

Action Result
1. Test with StickyKeys enabled.

  1. Go to the Control Panel - Accessibility Options. On the Keyboard tab, select the StickyKeys “Settings” button. When the dialog appears, enable the "Use shortcut" option and press OK. Select the “Use StickyKeys” option, select the Apply button, and then select the OK button.
  2. Switch the focus back to the application.
  3. Activate the StickyKeys feature using the keyboard shortcut (five clicks of the Shift key).
  4. Using only one finger, navigate throughout the application. Activate multiple key stroke sequences (e.g. Ctrl+P for print) using only one finger.
Pass:

Multiple key stroke sequences can be activated by pressing and releasing each key sequentially.

Fail:

Multiple key stroke sequences can only be activated by pressing the keys simultaneously.
2. Test with FilterKeys enabled.

  1. Go to the Control Panel - Accessibility Options. On the Keyboard tab, select the FilterKeys “Settings” button. When the dialog appears, enable the "Use shortcut" option, enable the "Ignore repeated keystrokes" option, and select the OK button. Select the “Use FileterKeys” option, select the Apply button and then select the OK button.
  2. Switch focus back to the application.
  3. Activate the FilterKeys function using the keyboard shortcut (press and hold the right Shift key for 8 seconds).
  4. Go to a text typing area in the application.
Pass:

Only one letter is displayed on the screen when you press and hold a key.

Fail:

Multiple copies of a letter are displayed on the screen when you press and hold a key.
3. Test with ToggleKeys enabled.

  1. Go to the Control Panel - Accessibility Options. On the Keyboard tab, select the ToggleKeys “Settings” button. When the dialog appears, enable the "Use shortcut" option and select the OK button. Select the “Use ToggleKeys” option, select Apply, and then select OK.
  2. Switch focus back to the application.
  3. Activate the ToggleKeys function using the keyboard shortcut (press and hold the NumLock key for 5 seconds).
  4. To test, take turns pressing the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys.
Pass:

An audio tone sounds when the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys are pressed.

Fail:

No audio tone sounds when the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys are pressed.
4. Test with MouseKeys enabled.

  1. Go to the Control Panel - Accessibility Options. On the Mouse tab, select the “Settings” button. When the dialog appears, enable the "Use shortcut" option and select OK. Select “Use MouseKeys”, select Apply, and then select OK.
  2. Switch the focus back to the application.
  3. Activate the MouseKeys function using the keyboard shortcut (Left-Alt+Left-Shift+NumLock).
  4. Use the arrow keys to move the mouse pointer.
Pass:

The mouse pointer can be moved using the arrow keys.

Fail:

The mouse pointer does not move when using the arrow keys.
5. Test with HighContrast enabled.

  1. Go to the Control Panel - Accessibility Options. On the Display tab, select the “Settings” button. When the dialog appears, enable the "Use shortcut" option,press OK. Select “Use High Contrast”, select Apply, and OK.
  2. Switch the focus back to the application.
  3. Activate the HighContrast function using the keyboard shortcut (Left-Alt+Left-Shift+PrintScreen).
option,press OK. Select
Pass:

The color scheme for the displayed information is changed to the HighContrast scheme.

Fail:

The color scheme for the displayed information is not changed to the HighContrast scheme, or not fully changed to the high contrast scheme.

Unix test techniques

The following techniques are required to verify this checkpoint:


Action Result
1. Test with Sticky Keys enabled.

  1. Refer to the AccessX user documentation for information on how to enable the keyboard shortcut for Sticky Keys.
  2. Switch the focus to the application.
  3. Activate the Sticky Keys feature using the keyboard shortcut (press the Shift key 5 times).
  4. Using only one finger, navigate in the application. Activate multiple key stroke sequences (e.g., Ctrl-P for print) using only one finger.
Pass:

Multiple key stroke sequences can be activated by pressing and releasing each key sequentially.

Fail:

Multiple key stroke sequences can only be activated by pressing the keys simultaneously.
2. Test with Repeat Keys enabled.

  1. Refer to the AccessX user documentation for information on how to enable the Repeat Keys keyboard shortcut.
  2. Switch focus back to the application.
  3. Activate the Repeat Keys function using the keyboard shortcut (press and hold either Shift key for 8 seconds).
  4. Activate a text typing area in the application. Press and hold a letter key on the keyboard.
Pass:

Only one letter is displayed on the screen when you press and hold a key.

Fail:

Multiple copies of a letter are displayed on the screen when you press and hold a key.
3. Test with Toggle Keys enabled.

  1. Refer to the AccessX user documentation for information on how to enable the Toggle Keys function.
  2. Switch focus back to the application.
  3. Activate the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys.
Pass:

An audio tone sounds when you press the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys.

Fail:

No audio tone sounds when you press the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys.
4. Test with Mouse Keys enabled.

  1. Refer to the AccessX user documentation for information on how to enable Mouse Keys.
  2. Switch focus back to the application.
  3. Move the mouse pointer using the arrow keys.
Pass:

The mouse pointer can be moved using the arrow keys.

Fail:

The mouse pointer does not move when using the arrow keys.

OS X test techniques

The following techniques are required to verify this checkpoint:


Action Result
1. Test with Sticky Keys enabled.

  1. Turn Sticky Keys on from the Universal Access Control Panel.
  2. Switch the focus to the application.
  3. Activate the Sticky Keys feature using the keyboard shortcut (5 clicks of the Shift key).
  4. Using only one finger, navigate in the application. Activate multiple key stroke sequences (e.g., Ctrl-P for print) using only one finger.
Pass:

Multiple key stroke sequences can be activated by pressing and releasing each key sequentially.

Fail:

Multiple key stroke sequences can only be activated by pressing the keys simultaneously.
2. Test with Slow Keys enabled.

  1. Turn Slow Keys on from the Universal Access Control Panel.
  2. Switch focus to your application.
  3. Go to a text typing area in the application. Press and hold a letter key on the keyboard.
Pass:

Only one letter is displayed on the screen when you press and hold a key.

Fail:

Multiple copies of a letter are displayed on the screen when you press and hold a key.
4. Test with Mouse Keys enabled.

  1. Turn Mouse Keys on from the Universal Access Control Panel
  2. Switch focus to your application.
  3. Activate the Mouse Keys feature using the keyboard shortcut (Command-Shift-Clear).
  4. Switch focus to your application.
  5. Move the mouse pointer using the arrow keys on the keyboard.
Pass:

The mouse pointer can be moved using the arrow keys on the keyboard.

Fail:

The mouse pointer does not move when using the arrow keys on the keyboard.

iOS test techniques

The following techniques are required to verify this checkpoint:


Action Result
1. Test with VoiceOver and a Bluetooth keyboard attached.

  1. Test that VoiceOver navigation keys work correctly.
Pass:

All documented VoiceOver keyboard navigation commands work with the application.

Fail:

One or more VoiceOver keyboard assignments fail to work.
This testing may be combined with other keyboard testing for efficiency.

©2009, 2013 IBM Corporation

Last updated January 28, 2013.