Checkpoint 502.2.2 No Disruption of Accessibility Features

Software shall not disrupt platform features that are defined in the platform documentation as accessibility features.

Rationale

Platforms, such as the Windows operating system and iOS, have a set of accessibility options that enables users with disabilities to customize system wide settings to improve accessibility. For example, a Windows user with a physical disability may not be able to press multiple key stroke sequences, such as Ctrl+Alt+Delete, simultaneously. Setting the Sticky Keys option enables the user to press and release the keys to invoke the desired function. For example, the user can press and release the Shift key 5 times, then press and release Ctrl, then Alt, then Delete to restart the Windows operating system.

Accessibility options make it possible for people with a variety of disabilities to use their computer. If the application software interferes with these options, some users may find their system unusable.

Note: This checkpoint addresses the requirement to not disrupt or override platform accessibility options, including the keyboard commands to control these options. Checkpoint 503.2 User Preferences addresses the requirement of applications to provide a mode of operation that inherits platform settings for color, contrast, font type, font size, and focus cursor.

Development Techniques

Note: Review the General techniques as well as other tabs applicable to your technology.  Prioritize the use of technology-specific techniques, and implement the General techniques as needed. You are always required to find, understand and implement accessible code techniques to meet the checkpoint. The documented techniques and supplements are not exhaustive; they illustrate acceptable ways to achieve the spirit of the checkpoint. If numbered, techniques are in order of preference, with recommended techniques listed first.

General techniques

Each item in this section represents a technique or combination of techniques deemed sufficient.

Not disrupting or disabling documented operating system features for accessibility

Most operating systems provide system-wide accessibility options that allow users to compensate for motor skill limitations, such as one-hand or no-hand operation, or tremors. Applications should not disrupt such features.

Not defining application keyboard shortcut keys that interfere with documented shortcut keys for operating system accessibility features

Operating systems frequently have dedicated shortcuts to enable or disable accessibility features. These keyboard shortcuts need to be globally available. Teams should not create application-specific keystrokes that conflict with these documented keystrokes in any supported operating system.

Mobile Native (iOS) techniques

Instructions: In addition to the General techniques, refer to Accessibility options available on iOS systems in Settings, General, Accessibility, and to documented VoiceOver keyboard commands for iPhone to ensure that the application does not overwrite any documented iOS accessibility features.

Eclipse techniques

Instructions: In addition to the General techniques, refer to the Accessibility Features in Eclipse and refer to the Microsoft Accessibility features supported in the version(s) of the Windows operating system supported by the application to ensure that the application does not overwrite any documented accessibility features.

Windows-based (MSAA+IA2) techniques

Instructions: In addition to the General techniques, refer to the Microsoft Accessibility features supported in the version(s) of the Windows operating system supported by the application to ensure that the application does not overwrite any documented accessibility features.


Most links in this checklist reside outside ibm.com at the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. W3C Recommendation 11 December 2008: http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/

Copyright © 1994-2017 World Wide Web Consortium, (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics, Keio University, Beihang University). All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2001, 2017 IBM Corporation